4.1.13

I love yew, yew, and yew


Now, darling, that's a hedge!


The churchyard at Painswick, with monolithic blocks of yew.
The churchyard at Painswick, with monolithic blocks of yew

For those fortunate 1%ers who have a few acres of frontage to work with,  consider this bad boy of a hedge above showcased recently in a blog I follow called Gardenista. (The post is titled "Renew with Yew: The Easiest and (Hardiest) Hedge for Your Garden")

I find yews overused but for good reason. They can really take hard pruning and/or regular clipping but are so slow growing. Cultivars of Taxus x media like "Densiformis", "Wardii", "Hicksii"  and "Hillii" are commonly found in our garden centres, nurseries and, therefore, local gardens. Inevitably, they are shaped into variations of meatballs growing 2 feet away from the front of the house. All this in the name of "foundation planting"! 



A random collection or a formal avenue of yews is a common sight in rural churchyards. In Painswick, Gloucestershire
A random collection or a formal avenue of yews is a common sight in rural churchyards. In Painswick, Gloucestershire.


If shrub lollipops, popsicles and gigantic potatoids interest you, here's inspiration! I admit this would look fabulous right now with the snow we're having in Toronto. Your labour costs would likely go through the roof but so would the "wow" factor for an appreciative audience of this sort of look.



Irish yews at Sissinghurst
Irish yews at Sissinghurst




By Paul Jung, author of "garden muses: a Toronto gardening blog"
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